Blog

Coins: A Fascinating History

  In the age of “paying with plastic” and scanning your smartphone to buy coffee and just about everything else, it’s easy to forget whose face graces which United States coin. Do you remember which president is on a dime? How about the image on the reverse side...

What Are The Different Types Of Silver?

At Southwest Jewelry Buyers, we have a deep appreciation for silver. This Precious Metal, after all, has played an amazing role in the history of Arizona. It all started in 1855. The California Gold Rush had just ended, and gold was hard to find. So, miners explored...

How Are Colored Diamonds Made?

When you think about diamonds, what comes to mind? If you’re like most folks, it likely involves clear and sparkly gems full of beauty, glamor, and Jewelry With Sentimental Meaning. However, diamonds aren’t limited to the white crystals you know and love. Our amazing...

Diamond Cuts: Everything You Need to Know

  According to the Gemological Institute of America (GIA), “a diamond’s cut unleashes its light.” Most people have heard of the 4Cs of Diamond Quality — carat, color, clarity, and cut. It all sounds simple enough, until the jeweler starts talking about things...

Selling Your Precious Metals: A Quick Primer

  When it comes to selling anything of value—jewelry, collectibles, handbags—it pays to do your homework. This is especially true when it comes to precious metals, since many buyers are either not skilled enough to determine their value or they are counting on...

How Are Diamonds Formed?

  Receiving a diamond can feel like the start of a new journey. After all, there’s so much potential to make memories with a gemstone, even if you decide to Sell Your Jewelry one day. But have you ever thought about the journey of a diamond? By the time it...

Silver: A Sterling Piece of Arizona History

We tend to hear a lot about the California Gold Rush of 1849, back when tens of thousands of hopeful prospectors headed west with the dream of striking it rich. At the time, Arizona was seen as a means to end—an expanse of rugged territory people needed to cross on...